Tag Archives: summer dessert recipe

finished curd 2

Lemon Curd Dresses Up Simple Summer Desserts

Just as jewelry accessorizes outfits, condiments can accessorize recipes. Around this time of summer when blueberries, blackberries and raspberries are abundant, a jar of lemon curd stashed in the fridge is the key to instantly dressing up quick and appealing fruit desserts.

Rich and tart lemon curd is the perfect foil for fresh and juicy berries, particularly blueberries. You can make up a batch using our favorite recipe below, or just buy a jar from the store. Once you have lemon curd on hand, you’ll keep discovering new uses for it. Here are some of our favorites:

  • Serve it with freshly baked scones or biscuits.
  • Whip heavy cream and fold in lemon curd; use as a filling for tarts, as in this recipe, or serve it in small dishes with berries and shortbread or wafer cookies on the side.
  • Swirl it into the filling of your favorite cheesecake recipe right before baking.
  • Layer it with whipped cream or yogurt and fruit for a classic fool.
  • Use dabs of it as a filling for thumbprint cookies.

We’re currently adoring these impressive but easy no-bake lemon-ginger ice cream sandwiches. Crisp and spicy ginger cookies soften in the freezer and provide a contrast to a smooth filling of lemon curd folded with premium ice cream. The flavor is decadent, but the portion size is perfect for when you want a satisfyingly cool and sweet nibble.

plated frozen sandwiches

These summertime faves are sweet and satisfying.

Easy Lemon-Ginger Ice Cream Sandwiches
From Linda Faus, former test kitchen director for The Oregonian

Makes small 16 sandwiches

These cool and refreshing four-bite treats hit the spot. They make a wonderful sweet midday snack or light dessert.

  • 1 pint premium vanilla ice cream, softened
  • 1/2 cup lemon curd, storebought or homemade (see recipe below)
  • 32 thin, crisp ginger cookies

In a medium bowl, beat the ice cream briskly with a sturdy wooden spoon until it is smooth. Return to the freezer for 15 minutes to firm.

sandwiches in tray to freeze

Be sure to freeze your sandwiches at least three hours before serving.

Lay 16 cookies, bottom-side up, on a rimmed baking sheet. Using a small ice cream scoop, dole about 2 tablespoons of the ice cream mixture onto each cookie and top with the remaining 16 cookies, pressing to flatten slightly.

Clear out a space in the freezer where the sheet will lay flat. Freeze for at least 3 hours before serving. To freeze longer, wrap each sandwich tightly in plastic wrap and place carefully in a plastic freezer bag. Use within 2 weeks.

finished curd 1

You’ll love finding scrumptious new uses for this lemon curd recipe!

Lemon Curd
Adapted from Lynne Sampson for The Oregonian

Makes 1⅔ cups

It takes time to make lemon curd, but it can feel meditative to stand at the stove and stir. If you don’t anticipate using all of the lemon curd within a month, simply freeze half to use later.

  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed and strained lemon juice
  • Grated zest of 2 lemons
  • 6 tablespoons butter

In a medium stainless steel, nonstick, or enameled saucepan, beat the eggs, yolks and sugar with a whisk until the sugar is mostly dissolved. Whisk in the lemon juice and zest.

Place the pan over medium-low heat and cook, stirring constantly with a heat-resistant spatula, making sure to scrape the bottom and corners of the pan. The mixture will slowly turn more opaque and the spatula will start to make visible swaths through the mixture, 10 to 15 minutes. Keep stirring until the curd is as thick as sour cream and coats the spatula, 2 to 3 minutes more.

Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the butter until it melts and the curd is smooth. Pour into a medium bowl and lay a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the lemon curd to prevent a crust from forming. Chill in the refrigerator for 4 hours before using. Store the lemon curd tightly sealed in the refrigerator for 1 month or in the freezer for up to 1 year.

by Sara Bir

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shortcake plated

Old-Fashioned Shortcakes Make the Most of Summer Fruits

Berries, the colorful glories of summer, are out in full force. Depending on where you live, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and cherries are abundant at farm stands, U-pick orchards and grocery stores. It’s a little challenging not to go overboard when working these sweet fruits into salads, smoothies and cobblers, or just popping them into your mouth, straight-up, as snacks.

Sandwiching berries in a tender and buttery shortcake is a classic option in which you should indulge this season. As a kid, you may have coveted those packages of golden sponge cakes that produce managers displayed next to the eye-catching display of ripe strawberries. Now that you’re older, you can pull together far superior shortcakes in your own kitchen with minimal baking time.

We prefer old-fashioned, biscuit-style shortcakes for their homespun charm and the berries’ sweetness that shines without an excessive amount of added sugar. And, best of all, they’re even faster to make than a boxed cake mix.

shortcake strawberries

Take advantage of strawberry season by preparing this sweet summertime treat!

Light and Fluffy Old-Fashioned Shortcakes

Makes 9 shortcakes

This comes from Marion Cunningham’s The Fannie Farmer Baking Book. The mixing technique is similar to our Mother’s Day scones, but there’s a beaten egg added here for a more cake-like crumb. We recommend using cake flour to make your shortcake light and fluffy, but regular all-purpose flour also works fine with this recipe. You may prepare the shortcakes a day in advance.

For the Shortcakes:

  • 2 cups cake flour
  • ½ teaspoon table salt
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick or ½ cup) unsalted butter, cold
  • ⅓ cup heavy cream or whole milk
  • 1 egg

For the Berries:

  • 2 pints fresh berries
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar, or to taste (some berries are sweeter than others)
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon or lime zest, optional

For the Whipped Cream:

  • 1 cup heavy cream, chilled
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar

1. To make the shortcakes, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, baking powder, cream of tartar and sugar. Grate the butter on the large holes of a box grater and toss it with the flour mixture. Using your fingertips or a pastry cutter, work the butter into the flour until it looks like fine crumbs. Measure the cream in a glass measuring cup, crack the egg into it, and beat with a fork until well combined.

shortcake butter cut into flour

Combine your butter and flour until the mixture has a fine crumb-like appearance.

3. Pour the cream mixture over the flour-butter mixture and, with your hands, gently work until it comes together to form a rough, shaggy dough that’s slightly sticky. (Add a sprinkle of flour if the dough it too loose; add a drizzle of cream if it feels too dry or crumbly.) Knead for four or five turns on a lightly floured surface and pat into a 7-inch by 7-inch square. Cut into nine squares and transfer to the baking sheets (giving the shortcakes plenty of room allows them to brown more evenly).

4. Bake until golden in spots, for 15 to 20 minutes, rotating the baking sheets front to back and top to bottom halfway through. Allow to cool on a wire rack.

shortcakes, baked

You can choose to prepare your shortcakes a day in advance.

5. Rinse and drain the berries when you’re ready to prepare them. If using strawberries, stem them before halving or slicing. Toss together with the sugar and (if using) lemon or lime zest. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

6. Prepare the whipped cream shortly before serving. Combine the heavy cream and sugar in a large bowl and beat by hand or with an electric mixer until it makes soft, rounded peaks.

7. Gently split the shortcakes with a serrated knife or fork. Spoon the berries and their accumulated juice over the bottom halves of the shortcakes, top with a generous dollop of whipped cream, then top with the top half of the shortcake. Serve immediately with any remaining berries or whipped cream on the side.

shortcake plated 2

This seasonal treat makes one fabulous dessert!

We hope you enjoy making this delightful summer dessert! Bon appétit!

by Sara Bir

Bloglovin

Light & Cool Sweet Wine Syllabub Recipe

wine syllabub photo

Here are a few things that are easier than making syllabub: sneezing, taking a nap, making instant pudding. Syllabub is way better than instant pudding, and way more grown-up. But, just like instant pudding, it requires no standing over a hot burner or turning on the oven. It’s boozy yet light and citrusy all at once, and it can even be made a few hours in advance.

The wine flavor should be strong, yet not overpowering; syllabub is a dessert, not a dessert cocktail. This old-time treat has British origins, dating back to at least the sixteenth century. Those early syllabubs contained much higher proportions of wine and were intended to separate so the froth could be served in a different glass alongside the liquid.

Syllabub also has deep roots in America’s South. Heirloom Finds’ co-founder Jeanne, who grew up in Georgia, recalls her mom’s syllabub pump. But you don’t need a goofy gadget to make syllabub. All you need is a bowl and a whisk, though an electric mixer is helpful. And if you avoid alcohol, there are still options for simple, cooling desserts. Try a fool, which likewise stars fruit and heavy cream.

picture of syllabub ingredients

All the makings of a light, summery syllabub!

Light and Summery Syllabub

Serves 6-8

We like to use Quady Electra white wine, made with orange muscat grapes. Preferably you should use a drinking-quality wine, one you’d be happy to sip on later, but you don’t need to splurge.

  • ½ plus 2 tablespoons sweet white wine
  • 1 tablespoon orange liqueur, such as Grand Mariner (or just add an extra tablespoon of the sweet white wine)
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • Finely grated zest of one lemon
  • Fresh fruit, such as blueberries and sliced strawberries, for serving
  1.  In a small bowl, whisk together the wine, orange liqueur (if using), and granulated sugar until the sugar dissolves.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the cream until it’s doubled in volume and has soft, but not stiff, peaks.
  3. Using a large rubber spatula, fold in the wine mixture and the lemon zest. Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 hours.
  4. To serve, spoon the syllabub into small glasses and garnish with fruit. Offer simple but good-quality butter cookies on the side, if you like.

By Sara Bir

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