Tag Archives: bakelite


How to Restore a Piece of Vintage Costume Jewelry – And Whether You Should

Perhaps you gasped at the title of this piece. After all, any serious vintage collector or fashionista knows you should leave vintage jewelry in its original state. Right?

In general, I agree with that rule and almost all of the vintage jewelry we offer at HeirloomFinds.com is in its original condition, just as we find it at estate sales and flea markets. We simply hand clean the surface and tighten jump rings and clasps as necessary.

However, as the buyer of all the vintage goodies that appear on the site, I will confess that there are occasions when nothing but a complete cleaning and restoration will save a tired piece of otherwise wonderful old jewelry.

I employ the 3 R’s when out shopping and sometimes actually buy less than perfect pieces. As I examine each piece of jewelry before buying, I ask myself where it falls on this scale:

  • Resell – Yay! This item is beautiful, stylish, wearable and ready to offer on the site.
  • Rubbish – Well, that one is obvious, right?
  • Restore – I use this categorization infrequently, but I want to discuss that here.

When should you attempt to restore a piece of vintage jewelry? On rare occasions, you may find a mistreated or neglected piece of vintage jewelry that is so striking in its design or use of materials, so evocative of an era or a designer that you are driven to find a way to restore it and find it a new home.


Sometimes, restoring vintage jewelry is worth the effort.

I acquired the necklace pictured here in a box lot at a recent auction. It was so dingy at first that I really showed it no love. A second glance as I unpacked my treasures of the day revealed the true nature of this gem. Stunning pre-war style? Check! Quality materials? Check! All parts present, intact and working? Check!

This 1930’s Brass and Prystal Bakelite Drop Festoon Necklace was really showing its age in a bad way. The reverse of the book chain had green gunky tarnish and the Bakelite baubles were so dirty and oxidized that they appeared opaque.  However, it had great “bones”.

Funk Before

This necklace was basically unwearable prior to restoration.

Given the choice of leaving the piece dirty (and basically unwearable) or restoring it to something very close to its original condition, I chose the latter. Please note that the techniques used in this restoration project will not work with all vintage pieces. They do work very well with brass and Bakelite.


Gathering the tools you need is an important first step in restoring old jewelry.

The required tools and materials are:

  • Needle nose pliers
  • Simichrome metal polish (truly the best for this task)
  • Soft toothbrush
  • Cotton swabs
  • Toothpicks
  • Soft cotton towel
  • Rubber gloves (your mani will thank you)

Here’s how to do it:

  1. Carefully remove the transparent Bakelite heptahedron (yep, it’s a word) drops from the brass bead drops using the needle nose pliers. Place the original jump rings aside, as you will need to reuse them.

    Be careful when removing the Bakelite beads. Don’t lose them!

  2. Soak those Prystal drops in water with a few drops of dishwater, then gently scrub them with a soft toothbrush and rinse.


    Remove the beads and let them soak in soapy water.

  3. Hand polish the Bakelite beads with a dab of Simichrome. Perhaps you have heard of testing Bakelite with Simichrome, but did you know that is also removes the surface oxidation, grime and scratches, revealing beautiful colors and a smoother finish?


    Simichrome removes grime to bring out the Bakelite beads’ gorgeous colors.

  4. Carefully hand polish the brass chains and bead drops with Simichrome. This step takes patience, care and elbow grease. For the most tarnished or dirty areas, I found the toothbrush to be a very effective tool. Cotton swabs and toothpicks were also useful in crevices. I then polished the entire piece with a soft cotton cloth. Don’t forget to polish the jump rings as well.


    Use a toothbrush to gentry scrub off excessive funk.

  5. Reattach the Bakelite drops using the needle nose pliers.

    Clean and Pretty

    Once the beads are back on, you can’t help but admire the brass and beads’ restored gleam!

  6. Marvel at the transformation. I confess that the necklace is not “like new.” No vintage Bakelite piece is ever truly in its original state, as the colors of the plastic change over the years. However, I love the way the Catalin Prystal and brass glow after the facelift.

A bit of cleaning has given new life to this fabulous vintage bauble.

As with any restoration project, remember to research the materials in your piece for the appropriate tools, chemical and techniques. Use care and clean/polish gently. Trust me, in the early days I had a few restoration fails that were heartbreaking, which led me to be more careful when studying materials and experimenting with other techniques.

by Jeanne Peters

Vintage Bakelite Jewelry

Bakelite Beauties

Bakelite Jewelry – those clunky, funky plastic baubles that always remind us of pinup girls and Rosie the Riveter. Introduced in the first decade of the 20th century in New York by chemist Leo Baekeland (who was actually trying to make a substitute for shellac), Bakelite was used for both industrial and decorative products, but reached its zenith with the fabulous fashion jewelry of the World War II era. With most metals in short supply due to the war cause, jewelry-making materials were limited and designers turned to this incredibly durable and bright plastic.
Cherry Bakelite
The heavy plastic lent itself to big, bold, modern designs that perfectly suited the “can-do” attitude of the legions of women working in factories and offices across the US. Companies such as Catalin and Prystal turned out loads of beads, bangles and baubles from the 1920’s through the 1950’s. And home hobbyists even learned to carve the plastic blocks into unique jewelry creations.
bakelite bow
Wearing vintage Bakelite treasures today inspires the same “joie de vivre” we see in the pinup girls of yesteryear. It also demonstrates a bit of fashion bravado, as most Bakelite jewelry is anything but timid. The oversized, whimsical carved brooches, bangles and necklaces crafted of this quintessentially retro plastic will definitely get you noticed!

By Jeanne Peters